KTNA Studio – Dave Totten, artist

Photo by Deb Wessler

Photo by Dora Miller

KTNA Studio

KTNA On Air Studio, Jan 2013

Photo by Deb Wessler

Photo by James Trump

Winter Black-capped Chickadee

winter chickadee

Photo by Robin Song

Fish Lake morning

Fish Lake morning

photo: Robin Song

Archives

KTNA anniversary audio–Betty Menard’s mountaineering first

Friday, May 3, 2013

KTNA is celebrating 20 years broadcasting to the Upper Susitna Valley by bringing you audio broadcast during the past two decades. We share the past with you on 88.9 FM every Friday at 12:35.

This week, one of a series of stories about women on Denali that KTNA news producer Johanna Eurich recorded in 1997. In this segment, Johanna talks to former Trapper Creek resident Betty Menard, who, at 21, became the first Alaska Native woman to climb Denali, earning her a page in mountaineering history.

Denali Women-Betty Menard-5min18sec

Betty Menard now spends most of her time in sunnier climes.

Striker named to top Denali National Park post

Thursday, December 6, 2012

The National Park Service has named Don Striker as its new Superintendent for Denali National Park. Striker is currently superintendent for New River Gorge National Park in West Virginia. KTNA’s Lorien Nettleton spoke with Striker about his move to one of the nation’s most recognized national parks. (more…)

Adventurer Lonnie Dupre shares stories from 25 years on the ice

Tuesday, January 17, 2012

Arctic adventurer Lonnie Dupre has spent the last week in Talkeetna enjoying time with the characters around town and recovering from his most recent expedition. Dupre had attempted to climb Mt. McKinley alone in the month of January, but had to call the voyage off when weeks of potent storms kept him from being able to safely travel at high altitude in extreme cold and against tremendous winds. (more…)

Alone in the mountains – Masatoshi Kuriaki still chasing solo ascent of Hunter

Thursday, January 12, 2012

Minnesotan adventurer Lonnie Dupre has called off his quest to climb Mt. McKinley alone in the month of January after 18 days on the mountain. Beset by raging storms, extreme winds, and phenomenal cold, the climber has ceded victory to the Mountain and returned to Talkeetna.

One climber is still out in Denali National Park, steadily making his approach to the third-tallest peak in the Alaska Range. Japanese mountaineer Masatoshi Kuriaki has been steadily making his approach on Mount Hunter since December 14th. It is his 6th attempt to summit Mt. Hunter alone in Winter, a feat never before achieved. (more…)

Denali Entrance Fees altered once more

Tuesday, January 3, 2012

The National Park Service is changing the way it charges visitors to Denali National Park and Preserve. Visitors now will be charged per head, not per vehicle.

The Fairbanks Daily News-Miner says after reviewing public comments, the park service has decided to eliminate a $20-a-vehicle entrance fee and instead charge a flat $10-a-person entrance fee for visitors age 16 and older. That means a vehicle with four adults in it will have to pay $40 instead of $20. (more…)

Lonnie Dupre ready for 2nd Solo try for Denali in Darkest Month

Thursday, December 22, 2011

Tuesday’s Snowstorm has delayed alpinist Lonnie Dupre’s ambition of undertaking a solo ascent of Mt. McKinley in the Month of January. Dupre, who is in Talkeetna and waiting for a weather window to open, will tackle North America’s tallest peak for a second time. To date, no climber has made it to McKinley’s summit alone in the month of January.

Dupre had planned to start his conquest of Mt. McKinley on the shortest day of the year. With just 38 days to complete his quest, he will be using the same alpine-style approach as last year to allow for fast travel, should the weather be cooperative. (more…)

Managing the wild – discussion for McKinley guide permits continues

Friday, October 14, 2011

The National Park Service has extended the comment period for the Environmental Assessment of permit allocations for climbing Mount McKinley until October 31st.

The Environmental Assessment, or EA, is an attempt by the Park Service to address an item in the 2006 Backcountry Management Plan that limits guided permits to 25 percent of all permitted climbs on the mountain, or 375 guided permits out of the total 1500 permits available each season. This limit has guide companies worried about their ability to sustain their businesses, and see the Park as imposing a choke on commercial activity. (more…)

Mountain Guides wary of permit restrictions

Wednesday, October 12, 2011

A National Park Service Environmental Assessment regarding the allocation of climbing permits between commercial guided climbing operators and independent, non-guided climbers on Mount McKinley has the six companies that currently guide on Denali up in arms.

There is a limit of 1500 climbers permitted on Mount McKinley each season. For the past 15 years approximately 1200 climbers have attempted the mountain. There has been an upswing in the number guided clients to almost 40%. NPS is concerned with displacing independent, non-guided climbers if the number of climbers nears the cap of 1500. They want to balance the various options of the park visitors who are climbers. The cap was determined in the 2006 Backcountry Management Plan along with the 25 percent allotment of permits to all commercial guide companies. (more…)

Denali National Park and Preserve to increase mountaineering use fee

Wednesday, September 7, 2011

Denali National Park and Preserve recently concluded a multi-year public

engagement process regarding a proposed increase to the Special Use Fee

that directly supports management of climbing activities on Mt. McKinley

and Mt. Foraker. After a lengthy examination of current program costs,

analysis of public comment, and collaboration with national climbing

organizations, Denali National Park and Preserve will increase its

Mountaineering Use Fee from $200 to $250 for youth ages 24 and under, and

$350 for all other Mt. McKinley and Mt. Foraker climbers. (more…)