KTNA Studio – Dave Totten, artist

Photo by Deb Wessler

Photo by Dora Miller

KTNA Studio

KTNA On Air Studio, Jan 2013

Photo by Deb Wessler

Photo by James Trump

Winter Black-capped Chickadee

winter chickadee

Photo by Robin Song

Fish Lake morning

Fish Lake morning

photo: Robin Song

Archives

StarDate Susitna 9-17-2017

Monday, September 18, 2017
Sunrise at Big Horn Medicine Wheel, Wyoming

Sunrise at Big Horn Medicine Wheel, Wyoming

It’s the Fall Equinox edition! Your questions answered here by host, writer, and producer Kathleen Fleming.

The Ecology of Glacial Rivers–Su River runs of humpback, sockeye, and coho

Sunday, September 3, 2017
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Adult Coho Salmon–photo credit Susitna Salmon Center

 

The seventh in a series from the Susitna Salmon Center. This segment by Jeff Davis deviates from the ecology theme to tell about the runs of the other four species of  salmon in the Susitna River drainage. From tagging studies, Department of Fish and Game biologists have information about when the runs are, where most of the salmon spawn, how long they spend in freshwater habitats, and other details of the spawning season. Chinook salmon were covered in the previous episode.

Until recently, it was commonly believed that glacial rivers, like the Susitna River, served primarily as migration corridors for Pacific Salmon and that they provided little spawning, rearing, or overwintering habitat. Recent studies tracking radio-tagged salmon in the Susitna River showed that a portion of adult salmon spawn within the Susitna River mainstem. (more…)

The Ecology of Glacial Rivers: The role of beavers

Sunday, August 20, 2017

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The fifth in a series from the Susitna Salmon Center: The Ecology of Glacial Rivers. This segment by Jeff Davis explains how beavers improve habitat for salmon.

Gravel bars that develop as glacial rivers move across the floodplain expose soils allowing for the establishment of wind-blown seeds of cottonwoods and willows. Willow stems transported and deposited on the gravel bars of glacial rivers also can develop roots and continue to grow in these new locations. Cottonwoods and willows along glacial rivers provide a food source for herbivorous beaver (Castor canadensis). While herbivorous, the Alaska Department of Fish and Game has published observations of beaver feeding on salmon carcasses in the Susitna River.

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Ecology of Glacial Rivers: Side Channels

Sunday, August 13, 2017

The fourth in a series from the Susitna Salmon Center: The Ecology of Glacial Rivers. This segment by Jeff Davis tells how side channels and side sloughs provide important salmon spawning and rearing habitat.

The balance between the amount and timing of high flows and sediment transported from glaciers results in a number of different kinds of habitats in glacial rivers. Previously, we compared the fast main channel that contains a large amount of suspended sediment and clear-water upland sloughs that develop in abandoned channels cut off from the mainstem. Other habitat types common in glacial rivers include side channels and side sloughs. These two habitat types differ in the amount of water they receive from the main channel compared to groundwater sources.

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The Ecology of Glacial Rivers: Upland or backwater sloughs

Sunday, July 30, 2017
upland slough, photo credit Susitna Salmon Center

Upland slough, photo credit Susitna Salmon Center

The third of a new series from the Susitna Salmon Center: The Ecology of Glacial Rivers. This segment by Jeff Davis, and voiced by Katie Kierczynski, describes how suspended sediment changes conditions in main channels of glacial rivers, and how fish have adapted to these changes.

Upland sloughs occur along the margins of glacial rivers and have physical conditions that are very different from the main channel. Upland sloughs develop as the main channel moves across the floodplain abandoning the old channel. Over time, the upstream end of the abandoned channel becomes vegetated and the slough becomes isolated from the mainstem. (more…)

The Ecology of Glacial Rivers: How fish have adapted to silty water

Sunday, July 23, 2017
Longnose Sucker, photo by Annie Helmsworth

Longnose Sucker, photo by Annie Helmsworth

The second of a new series from the Susitna Salmon Center: The Ecology of Glacial Rivers. This segment, by Jeff Davis, describes how suspended sediment changes conditions in main channels of glacial rivers, and how fish have adapted to these changes.

The main channels of glacial rivers carry a large amount of fine sediment suspended in the water column during the summer months when runoff from glaciers is at its highest. This sediment gives glacial rivers their brown or turbid appearance. The amount of sediment can be reduced in glacial rivers that contain lakes, as some of sediment is deposited in the lakes.

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News from the Ranger Station 7-20-2017

Thursday, July 20, 2017
Bear tracks in Denali National Park-NPS photo

Bear tracks in Denali National Park-NPS photo

In this weekly segment, produced by the staff of the Walter Harper Talkeetna Ranger Station, we hear mountaineers tell several stories of wildlife seen on glaciers in the Alaska Range. There will be more wildlife stories next week.

 

Susitna Writer’s Voice–StarDate Susitna 7-16-2017

Sunday, July 16, 2017

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More audio paragraphs from a past Stardate Susitna program about the diversity of public events for those in the path of totality.  Also, up-to-date information about viewing the the solar eclipse from Talkeetna. It’s happening August 21st. Eclipse shades still available at KTNA.

The News from the Ranger Station 7-16-2017

Thursday, July 13, 2017
Glaciers on Denali-NPS photo

NPS photo–Glaciers flowing off Denali

In this weekly segment, produced by the staff of the Walter Harper Talkeetna Ranger Station, Ranger Laura Wright talks to NPS scientist Mike Loso about the recent surging of the Traleika Glacier.